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CHEM1001 - Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are described below. These outcomes are built from the learning activities in lectures, tutorials, laboratory and independent study. Important attributes are:
  • the ability to apply scientific knowledge and critical thinking to identify, define and analyse problem and create solutions: you will be expected to demonstrate these outcomes on problems drawn from the material presented in the course and to novel situations.
  • the ability to evaluate your own performance and development and to recognize gaps in your knowledge: keep a portfolio of your progress using the 'self assessment tool'
The ways in which these outcomes are assessed are described in detail in the unit outline. When reading this, you should note that the laboratory course is self-contained: material from the lab course is assessed in the lab course and is not re-assessed in the tutorial quizzes or examination.
  • Generic Attributes
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  apply scientific knowledge and critical thinking to identify, define and analyse problems, create solutions, evaluate opinions, innovate and improve current practices
    •  gather, evaluate and deploy information relevant to a scientific problem
    •  disseminate new knowledge and engage in debate about scientific issues
    •  recognize the rapid and sometimes major changes in scientific knowledge and technology, and to value the importance of continual growth in knowledge and skills
    •  use a range of computer software packages in the process of gathering, processing and disseminating scientific knowledge
    •  make value judgements about the reliability and relevance of information in a scientific context
    •  evaluate your own performance and development, to recognize gaps in knowledge and acquire new knowledge independently
    •  set achievable and realistic goals and monitor and evaluate progress towards these goals
    •  appreciate sustainability and the impact of science within the broader economic, environmental and socio-cultural context
    •  present and interpret data or other scientific information using graphs, tables, figures and symbols
    •  work independently and as part of a team and to take individual responsibility with a group for developing and achieving goals
    •  actively seek, identify and create effective contacts with others in a professional and social context, and maintain those contacts for mutual benefit
    •  recognize the importance of safety and risk management and compliance with safety procedures
    •  manipulative equations and measurements with due regard for significant figures and unit conventions
  • Laboratory Skills
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  perform careful and safe experiments
    •  accurately report scientific observations
    •  work as a professional scientist with due regard for personal safety and for the safety of those around you
    •  interpret observations in terms of chemical models with appropriate use of chemical equations and calculations
    •  perform calculations containing concentrations, moles and masses
    •  choose and use appropriate glassware for a given task
    •  choose and use balances accurately and appropriately
    •  present and interpret data or other scientific information using graphs, tables, figures and symbols
    •  work as a member of a team and to take individual responsibility within a group for developing and achieving group goals
    •  actively seek, identify and create effective contacts with others in a professional and social context, and maintain those contacts for mutual benefit
  • Elements and Atoms
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain what an element is
    •  appreciate that elements may be metals or non-metals and may be solids, liquids or gases and what these terms mean
    •  recognize that elements are labelled using their chemical symbol
    •  explain the differences between elements, compounds and mixtures
    •  explain the difference between allotropes and the physical state of an element
    •  explain what atoms are and how they combine to form compounds
    •  appreciate the difference between physical and chemical properties
    •  list the particles that make up atoms, their symbols and their relative masses and charges
    •  read and write the atomic symbol containing the mass number and atomic number
    •  explain what isotopes are and work out the number of neutrons an isotope contains from its atomic symbol
    •  explain how elements can change into another by radioactive decay
    •  explain what light is and how its energy is related to its frequency and wavelength
    •  draw the shell structure of atoms with up to 18 electrons
  • Molecules and Ions
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  work out the number of electrons an ion has from its symbol
    •  recognize that most ions have a Noble gas configuration
    •  predict whether an element will form a cation or an anion
    •  explain the characteristics of ionic bonding
    •  read and write the chemical formula of ionic compounds
    •  name simple binary ionic compounds according to IUPAC nomenclature
    •  explain how covalent molecules are bonded together and how they differ from ionic compounds
    •  draw simple Lewis dot and line diagrams showing single, double and triple bonds and lone pairs
    •  read and write the chemical formula of covalent compounds
    •  use molecular formula, empirical formula and structural formula
    •  name simple covalent compounds using IUPAC nomenclature
    •  predict the polarity of the bonds in molecules
    •  list the properties of metallic, ionic and covalent solids
  • Chemical Equations
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain what chemical reactions are and why they occur
    •  identify reactions as being combination, precipitation, decomposition, replacement or acid/base
    •  write balanced chemical equations for reactions of neutral species, including physical states
    •  write balanced chemical equations for reactions involving charged species, including physical states
    •  write balanced ionic equations for reactions without spectator ions, including physical states
    •  list the characteristics of acids including their reactions
  • Stoichiometry
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  work out atomic mass as a weighted average of isotope masses
    •  work out the molecular mass of a covalent compound from its chemical formula
    •  work out the formula mass of an ionic compound from its chemical formula
    •  relate the mass of a substance to the number of particles it contains using Avogadro's constant
    •  appreciate what a mole of substance is
    •  convert between mass and moles and between moles and mass
    •  work out which reactant is the limiting reagent in a reaction and use it to predict how much product can form
    •  work out the percentage yield in a chemical reaction by identifying the limiting reagent and the theoretical yield
    •  use experimentally determined percentage composition to work out the empirical formula
    •  identify the solvent, solute and solution for a reaction in a solution
    •  interconvert between moles, concentration and volume given two of these quantities
  • The Periodic Table
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  recognize the relationships between elements in the same periods and in the same groups
    •  predict the properties of an element from its position, including its metallic, semi-metallic or non-metallic properties and the acid, basic or amphoteric properties of its oxide
  • Atomic Energy Levels
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  identify the number of sub-shells available for each shell and the number of electrons that can fit in each of these
    •  write down electron configurations for atoms and ions
  • Lewis Model of Bonding
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  draw Lewis structures for molecules containing single and multiple bonds and with lone pairs
    •  draw resonance structures for molecules where more than one Lewis structure is possible
    •  recognize that molecules with resonance structures have bonds which are intermediate between single and double bonds
  • VSEPR
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  work out the number of bonding and non-bonding pairs from the Lewis structure of a molecule
    •  predict the distribution of these pairs around an atom
    •  place any lone pairs in appropriate positions to minimize the overall electron pair repulsion
    •  predict and describe the molecular shape
  • Gas Laws
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  use the ideal gas law to relate the number of moles, pressure, volume and temperature of a gas
    •  relate gas density and molar mass
    •  convert between the common units of pressure (atm, Pa and mmHg
    •  use the appropriate value of the gas constant, R
  • Thermochemistry
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain the difference between heat and temperature
    •  appreciate that heat is mostly associated with changes kinetic energy and chemical reactions are mostly associated with changes in potential energy
  • First Law of Thermodynamics
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain the difference between heat and temperature
    •  identify a process as endothermic or exothermic from the temperature change
    •  relate temperature and heat change using specific and molar heat capacities
    •  calculate internal energy changes using the bomb calorimeter
    •  define the difference between internal energy and enthalpy
    •  obtain the enthalpy change using a coffee-cup calorimeter
    •  use Hess's Law
    •  estimate reaction enthalpies from bond energies
    •  define standard states
    •  combine enthalpies of formation to work out the enthalpy change for chemical reactions
    •  combine enthalpies of reactions to work out the enthalpies of formation
    •  explain the advantages and disadvantages of solid, petroleum, hypergolic and cryogenic (hydrogen) fuels
    •  work out the efficiency of fuels
  • Types of Intermolecular Forces
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  describe the different kinds of intermolecular forces that exist
    •  identify which intermolecular forces are present and which are more important between different molecules
    •  relate variations in melting and boiling points in related compounds to their intermolecular forces
    •  describe the subunits of synthetic and natural polymers
    •  outline the role of intramolecular and intermolecular forces on the primary, secondary, quaternary and tertiary structure of synthetic and natural polymers
  • Oxidation Numbers
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  assign formal oxidation numbers to each atom in a compound
  • Nitrogen Chemistry and Compounds
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  work out the oxidation number of nitrogen in its compounds
    •  work out the shapes and the number of unpaired electrons on nitrogen oxides and halides
    •  explain the difference between a fuel and an explosive
  • Chemical Equilibrium
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain the dynamic nature of equilibrium processes
    •  write the equilibrium constant for any reaction or process
    •  use initial, change, equilibrium (ICE) tables and the small 'x' approach to work out equilibrium concentations
    •  use Le Chatelier's principle to predict the response of a system at equilibrium to changes in temperature, pressure and composition
    •  explain the difference between the equilibrium constant, K, and the reaction quotient, Q
    •  write down the reaction quotient and use it to predict the direction of change
    •  explain how catalysts effect chemical reactions without changing the equilibrium concentrations
  • Equilibrium and Thermochemistry in Industrial Processes
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain the main processes used industrially to extract metals from their ores
    •  use Ellingham diagrams to predict which metals can be extracted using coke at different temperatures
    •  outline the thermodynamic principles behind the industrially optimized routes to sulfuric acid and ammonia
  • Electrochemistry
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  relate the sign of the electrode potential to the direction of spontaneous change
    •  combine half cells to produce balanced redox reactions and to calculate cell potentials
    •  identify the species which are being oxidzied and those being reduced in a redox reaction
    •  write down the cell notation for a Galvanic cell including ones involving inert electrodes
    •  use the Nernst equation to calculate the effect of concentration on the cell potential
    •  relate the electrode potential and the reaction quotient
    •  relate the standard electrode potential and the equilibrium constant
  • Electrolytic Cells
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  identify the processes and species formed at the anode and cathode of Galvanic and electrolytic cells
    •  identify the direction of electron flow in Galvanic and electrolytic cells
    •  identify what can be electroysed and the role of over-potential in the electrolysis of water and in the production of NaOH and Cl2
    •  use Faraday's Laws of Electrolysis to relate the amount of product to the electric current applied
  • Electrochemistry (Batteries and Corrosion)
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain the difference between primary and secondary batteries
    •  identify the chemical reactions in common batteries
    •  explain how fuel cells work
    •  explain how corrosion occurs and can be reduced
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