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CHEM1102 - Resources - Resources for Week 9


Topics and Learning Outcomes

  • Periodic Trends
    •  recognize trends in the Periodic Table and the correlation between the trends in atomic radii, ionization energies and electronegativity
    •  explain the origin of these trends in terms of the electronic structure of the atoms
    •  predict reactivity based on these trends, particularly how the acid, base or amphoteric character of an element's oxide and hydroxide are related to its position in the Periodic Table
  • Intermolecular Forces and Phase Behaviour
    •  list the types of intermolecular forces and their relative strengths
    •  identify the intermolecular forces that exist for particular compounds
    •  rank melting and boiling points for related compounds on the basis of these forces
  • Physical States and Phase Diagrams
    •  identify characteristics of physical states
    •  label phase diagrams and relate phase diagrams to changes in state with temperature and pressure
    •  explain the anomalous behaviour of water using its phase diagram
    •  define supercritical fluids and the behaviour of compounds above the critical point
    •  interpret simple two-component phase diagrams
    •  apply entropy concept qualitatively to predict the direction of phase changes
  • Entropy
    •  define entropy in terms of the tendency of energy to spread out
    •  predict how entropy changes with the physical state, the temperature, the size of the molecule and the complexity of a molecule
    •  predict whether entropy increases or decreases for simple physical and chemical changes, especially for changes in physical state
    •  apply entropy concept qualitatively to predict the direction of phase changes

Textbook and eBook References

  • Periodic Trends in Aqueous Oxide - Section 11.8
  • Physical States and Phase Diagrams - Chapter 7
  • Intermolecular Forces and Phase Behaviour - Sections 6.7 - 6.8
the eBook references are free and are taken from high quality sources.

Lecture Notes, Tutorial Worksheets & Answers and Suggested Exam Questions

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ChemCAL and iChem Resources

Periodic Trends in Aqueous Oxide Physical States and Phase Diagrams Intermolecular Forces and Phase Behaviour

Contributed Links and Resources

You can contribute resources to this site and rank the existing resources: log in to eLearning and follow the link to 'Contribute' under 'Course Resources'.

Periodic Trends in Aqueous Oxide -  
  Electronegativity and bonding - interactive video  
 
Description: Select project = "chem1102" and video = "electronegativity and bonding"
Tags: electronegativity | bonding | polar bonds  |  Contributed by Adam Bridgeman
 
  Electronegativity and bonding (short video tutorial)  
 
Tags: electronegativity | bonding | polar bonds  |  Contributed by Adam Bridgeman
 
Physical States and Phase Diagrams -  
  Supercritical carbon dioxide (2)  
 
Description: Supercritical carbon dioxide being stirred like a liquid
Tags: phase diagrams  |  Contributed by Adam Bridgeman
 
  Supercritical carbon dioxide  
 
Description: At 31 'C, carbon dioxide becomes super critical if the pressure is very high. In the supercritical phase, it occupies space like a gas but flows like a liquid
Tags: phase diagrams  |  Contributed by Adam Bridgeman
 
  How to make liquid carbon dioxide  
 
Description: Under pressure, dry ice melts to give liquid carbon dioxide. It only sublimes at lower pressures
Tags: phase diagrams  |  Contributed by Adam Bridgeman
 
  The chemistry of snowflakes  
 
Description: Video showing how snowflakes form and grow
Contributed by Adam Bridgeman
 
  Intermolecular and intramolecular forces  
 
Description: Animated video describing and comparing intermolecular forces
Tags: dispersion | intermolecular forces  |  Contributed by Adam Bridgeman
 
Intermolecular Forces and Phase Behaviour -  
  Marbles defy entropy  
 
Tags: entropy  |  Contributed by Adam Bridgeman
 


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